Northumberland News: Province must examine possible health impacts of wind farms

This is where the Ministry of Health must step in. Since there is limited research on the health effects of exposure to low frequency sound, it’s time for the province rein in its love affair with wind power. In-depth health studies on people who live near existing wind turbine projects must be done to determine whether or not the turbines are making them sick before any more wind farms are brought on-line.

Northumberland News:  On the surface, a wind farm project should be a welcomed addition to any community. After all, with global warming, any process that has the potential to generate green electricity appears to be a step in the right direction.

Should all its ducks fall into place, Energy Farming Ontario will have its proposed ‘Clean Breeze Wind Farm’ project in Alnwick/Haldimand Township up and running sometime over the next three years. The project will feature up to 20 wind turbines, from 70 to 100 metres high, which will produce two to 2.5 megawatts of electricity each.

To the company’s credit, it is following the letter of the law set out in the province’s Green Energy Act regarding 550 metre setbacks from the turbines to neighbouring homes. But there is a well-organized contingent of residents who live in the area of the proposed wind farm who are gravely concerned the provincially-mandated setback will not be enough to block out the throbbing noise of the turbines and the high pitched noise of the electrical transformers.

In this case, perhaps the company could consider taking the high road, and, as good corporate citizens, listen to these concerns and increase its setbacks. The guidelines are after all, set as minimum standards and a move to increased setbacks will go a long way in gathering public support for this green energy initiative.

Residents are also worried about possible health hazards due to exposure to infrasound, lower frequency sound that has been said to cause health issues, like headaches, heart disease, tinnitus, nausea and non-specific symptoms of ill-health that will not go away unless a person leaves the area. And again, the company is correct in saying that to date, there is no clear scientific evidence to support this claim.

This is where the Ministry of Health must step in. Since there is limited research on the health effects of exposure to low frequency sound, it’s time for the province rein in its love affair with wind power. In-depth health studies on people who live near existing wind turbine projects must be done to determine whether or not the turbines are making them sick before any more wind farms are brought on-line.

Green energy generation must be part of our future if we hope to make any impact on global warming. But generating green energy using wind farms at the cost of possible health risks to people who live near them is an unacceptable price to pay.

One thought on “Northumberland News: Province must examine possible health impacts of wind farms

  1. What “Global Warming”?…………this article is a bit “out of touch” with what’s really going on today.

    Please do some research….even a little bit before putting pen to paper..this just bolsters the Wind Industry’s BS!

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