Ripley, Ontario Monitoring Report reveals alarming bat mortality

487 Bats estimated killed in only 16 weeks

Fall monitoring encompassed the months of July through mid-October, for a total of 16 weeks. A total of 116 bat carcasses were located by searchers, with a corrected estimated total for the season of 487.37 bat mortalities, with 12.83 bats per turbine for fall; and 6.41 bats per MW for fall. …

Download: Ripley-PCM-Report  
Author:  Jacques Whitford

In 2008, Jacques Whitford Limited was retained by Suncor Energy Products Inc. and Acciona Wind Energy Canada to undertake a bird and bat post-construction monitoring program for the Ripley Wind Power Project (the Project) near the Town of Ripley in Bruce County, Ontario. The Project began commercial operation on January 21, 2008. …

In 2008, mortality surveys were conducted in April and May (spring monitoring), and July through mid- October (fall monitoring). Avian monitoring was undertaken in June (for breeding bird surveys) and September through mid-November (for fall diurnal migration surveys). Surveys were carried out by qualified Jacques Whitford personnel, trained in the methods and protocols of the Program.

The mortality survey component of the Program incorporated three survey types; carcass surveys, searcher efficiency trials, and scavenger impact trials. Searcher efficiency trials were carried out each day of the carcass searches, and scavenger impact trials were carried out once monthly over two-week periods: in April, and in July through October. …

Mortality surveys were conducted from April 14 through May 30 (spring), and again from July 2 through October 17 (fall) of the same year. Mortality surveys were conducted when weather permitted. During inclement weather (i.e., heavy rainfall), surveys were delayed until later on the same day, or resumed on the next or the earliest feasible day. All mortality surveys were conducted by two biologists during each visit. …

Birds

Spring monitoring was undertaken April 14 to May 31, 2008, for a total of seven weeks. A total of six avian carcasses were located by searchers, with a corrected total estimate of 9.42 for the spring season; 0.25 per turbine for spring; and 0.12 per MW for spring. …

Fall monitoring encompassed the months of July through mid-October, for a total of 16 weeks. A total of 25 avian carcasses were located by searchers, with a corrected estimated total of 105.04 for the fall season; 2.76 birds per turbine for fall; and 1.38 per MW for fall. …

Bats

Spring monitoring encompassed the latter half of the month of April and the month of May, for a total of seven weeks. Four bat carcasses were located by searchers during spring monitoring, with a corrected estimate of 6.28 in total for the season; 0.17 bats per turbine for spring; and 0.08 bats per MW for spring. …

Fall monitoring encompassed the months of July through mid-October, for a total of 16 weeks. A total of 116 bat carcasses were located by searchers, with a corrected estimated total for the season of 487.37 bat mortalities, with 12.83 bats per turbine for fall; and 6.41 bats per MW for fall. …

6 thoughts on “Ripley, Ontario Monitoring Report reveals alarming bat mortality

  1. Maybe that’s why more MOSQUITOS are celebrating at outdoor parties as compared to previous years!

  2. How can carcass scavenging be considered a “green” initiative?

  3. Tree huggers always seem surprised when they hear that IWT’s kill birds and bats….

    But they turn so SLOooowwww…. Right?

    Let’s think about this…

    Consider a Vesta V82 turbine with a 41 meter radius …. (This is the Common 1.65MW model widely distributed.)

    The Rotor circumference is (82 X 3.14.59) 257.6 meters. (This is PI X D) Pi times the diameter to give the circumference.

    It turns (nominal) at 14.4 RPM at full output.
    This gives (14.4 X 257) 3,709.58 meters covered in one minute.

    So in one hour we get (60 min X 3709 meters/min) = 222.575 Km /hour, or 137.996 Miles Per Hour

    Put another way at 14.4 RPM the blade tip travels 62 meters in a second. Try to dodge that!

    At 7.5 RPM the blade would be traveling at 115.9 Km/Hr or 71 Miles per hour. (Almost as fast 401 traffic in Toronto on a congested day.)

    Again — that would be about 32 meters in a second.

    Now do you really think that birds and bats could dodge the blade tips? Could a tree-hugger dodge the blade tip? (Are we permitted to test?)

    You can verify these facts here.
    http://www.aweo.org/windmodels.html

    They list many of the common models.

    To get Km / Hour divide the miles per hour by 0.62 or multiply by 1.6 that will get you close enough.

  4. Oh yeah…

    Read what a tree hugger says here.

    http://www.treehugger.com/files/2006/04/common_misconce.php

    “To help our understanding of turbine hazards to birds we’d like to make an analogy, to your bicycle. Turn your bike upside down or put it in a work rack, set it to the highest gear…the one you use to go fast on a level slope…. and now move the wheel slowly with your hand. The chain moves rapidly with only a few degrees of wheel rotation. This symbolizes today’s cutting edge 1.5 mW turbines, which have a very large surface area of blade exposed to the wind and a gearbox that turns the dynamo quickly while the blades move slowly. Birds dodge these slow moving blades relatively easily.

    Now put the bike in the lowest gear…the one you use to climb hills…and move the wheel with your hand fast enough to turn the chain as fast as before. That symbolizes the 20-year-old “bird-o-matic” wind turbine design. Small blades with small surface areas have to turn rapidly to overcome the magnetic force of the dynamos, which generate electricity.”

    Common Misconceptions of a math challenged tree-hugger — could not have expressed it better myself..

    Are tree-huggers typically math challenged? I hope not as I are one too… eh?

  5. I would be more impressed if Suncor/Acciona had expressed concern for the human inhabitants adjacent to their turbines. Several of these people have been forced out of their homes. A group picture appeared on these pages recently.
    Nothing has changed in their battle with the wind developers.

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