Huron East cost recovery bylaw for wind turbines given first and second readings

By Susan Hundertmark, Seaforth Huron Expositor

A cost recovery bylaw aimed at “renewable energy generation facilities” was given first and second reading at Huron East council at its Sept. 21 meeting.

The bylaw, aimed at recouping expenses incurred by the municipality when it reviews applications to install facilities or created by damages to municipal infrastructure during construction, came from Huron East solicitor Greg Stewart with consultation from Kristi Ross, the lawyer representing Huron East Against Turbines (HEAT).

Ross recommended changes to the original bylaw, which will be reviewed by Stewart before the bylaw is given final reading.

“The reason for the change is the way it’s worded now is the energy approval is at the end of the process. We’ve always been concerned that the bylaw has teeth in it so it’s worth the paper it’s printed on,” said HEAT member Gerry Ryan.

Ryan added that HEAT is concerned that the municipality would have enough time to do any necessary review of a wind turbine company’s application.

McKillop Coun. Bill Siemon asked if any other municipalities than Arran-Elderslie and Bluewater had expressed interest in helping with the costs to launch a test case of a bylaw aimed at regulated low frequency noise.

Clerk-Administrator Jack McLachlan said he has heard from three municipalities that they would attend a meeting to discuss a low frequency noise test bylaw, from one that wasn’t interested and one that said maybe. The interested municipalities are Bluewater, Arran-Elderslie and Huron-Kinloss. He sent out 14 letters asking municipalities if they’d be interested in participating in a test bylaw on low frequency noise.

Siemon said he spoke to engineer Bill Palmer, one of the featured speakers at a public meeting last week hosted by HEAT and Central Huron Against Turbines (CHAT), and heard that a low frequency noise study has already been done.

“He said he’d be more than willing to provide comments of what should be in there,” said Siemon.

McLachlan added that the province has hired consultants Howe Gastmeier Chapnik Limited to do a low frequency noise study but he hasn’t learned yet where the public meetings will be held.

Huron East has not yet made any decisions about whether or not to proceed with a LFN test bylaw.

3 thoughts on “Huron East cost recovery bylaw for wind turbines given first and second readings

  1. “McLachlan added that the province has hired consultants Howe Gastmeier Chapnik Limited to do a low frequency noise study but he hasn’t learned yet where the public meetings will be held.”

    Hmmm… HGC Engineering is a CanWEA member being hired by the province as an “objective” consultant.

    http://www.canwea.ca/about/membersdirectory_e.php?letter=H

    Wasn’t the province’s acoustical engineering consultant also a CanWEA member?

    You would almost think it was a conspiracy.
    ;o)

  2. TLW:

    Absolutely not — just good business practice.

    “As an industry leader, we have produced a number of significant papers on the practical and theoretical aspects of wind farm noise measurements. We have also authored “Wind Turbines and Sound: Review and Best Practices Guide” for the Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA). This document outlines noise considerations in the development of wind turbine generation facilities in Canada.”

    From:
    http://www.hgcengineering.com/windpower.html

  3. http://aeinews.org/archives/695

    “500 metres (1/4 mile) from a wind turbine one measures some 40 dBA and a cyclical 58 to 65 dBC. A refrigerator at 3 metres (10 feet) measures about 40 dBA and a steady 45 dBC. A noisy conference room with lots of air conditioning noise measures 45 dBA and a steady 58 dBC. A vacuum cleaner at 3 metres measures 65 dBA and a steady 69 dBC.
    What we find is that at the home impacted by a wind turbine, while the A weighted sound level sound like a refrigerator, the unmonitored cyclical low frequency noise varying between the noisy conference room and the vacuum cleaner.”

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