Ontario “green” project may kill endangered species

The whippoorwill is the othe endangered species. By Mike Crawley, CBC News

A Toronto-based wind power company is proposing to build a green energy project on the shores of Lake Ontario ,but building the project could threaten two endangered species.

Gilead Resources would have the legal right to kill the two species — if the province approves the new proposal.  What the company is applying for is a permit that would allow it to “kill, harm and harass” two endangered species — Blanding’s turtle and the whippoorwill.

Gilead wants to build a wind farm on the shoreline in Prince Edward County. But the location is designated an “important bird area” and the endangered turtle nests there, as well.

Anne Bell of Nature Ontario says her group supports green energy but only so far. “We have to keep good projects out of bad locations,” said Bell, “and this is exactly what we’ve got here.”

The final decision rests with Natural Resources Minister Linda Jeffrey who says that “for the most part we can find ways to mitigate around endangered species reasonably, so that the species continues, and continues to thrive.”

But Myrna Wood, a resident in nearby Picton says she “just cannot believe the government will do this. None of us here can, we’re all astounded.”

But Jeffery counters that the “ministry has to find a balance between protection and allowing economic development — no matter what the species.”

In an email statement the company says it will do its best to mitigate the harm to the birds and turtles. It says it will create new nesting habitat and will build the project in winter, when the wildlife aren’t around.

9 thoughts on “Ontario “green” project may kill endangered species

  1. As for endangered species…the sooner the Ontario Liberals are extinct the better!

  2. What I find unusual about Gilead applying
    for this permit is the fact that they are
    admitting they actually will be threatening
    endangered species. Wind company’s are
    always quick to point out that they can
    ‘mitigate’ any issues. From the tone of
    Nat. Res. Minister Jeffery’s comments,
    mitigation is the rule of the day, and the
    permit approval will be a done deal.

  3. But Jeffery counters that the “ministry has to find a balance between protection and allowing economic development — no matter what the species.”

    THAT is such a big load of you know what. Only when it is in the interest of the Liberal government to push THEIR agenda is the balance between protection and economic development even mentioned. Otherwise the endangered species trumps anything else – even the livelihood of those who might have the misfortune of finding an endangered species on their land.

    The Regulations for Endangered Species have gotten so strict that even some of the bureaucrats admit that it is a detriment for endangered species. Who is going to admit that they have an endangered species on their property? NO ONE. Because it will hamper the way they use that land and cost them big time.

    Don’t get me wrong. Endangered species need to be protected. But the way the current government is going about it is wrong!

  4. “In an email statement the company says it will do its best to mitigate the harm to the birds and turtles. It says it will create new nesting habitat and will build the project in winter, when the wildlife aren’t around.”

    Seriously? Is our government that bloody stupid? Anyone else seen any herds of migrating turtles?
    Ya…I thought not. What they mean is they will kill them when they are hibernating and no one is looking.

  5. Maybe the people who are so eager to host IWTs on their property might start thinking about building themselves Faraday cages to protect themselves during sever weather just like some people in the U.S have to build tornado shelters to protect themselves.

    • By the way motor vehicles are also Farady cages if you don’t touch any part of the metal frame of the vehicle when in contact with electricity.

  6. Sounds like it may be helpful to ask questions (such as electrocution risk) in one’s comment. (MOE/MNR mentioned unknowns in explaining offshore moratorium.)

    I’m wondering about turbine transmission of vibrations and infrasound to limestone and sediments (per Italian study)–has anyone studied effect on ground-oriented Blanding’s Turtle and Killdeer? (I’m finding nothing specific, but enough to make me wonder.)

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