Should we laugh or cry? OEA just doesn’t get it

Voters will Decide

The Ontario Energy Association’s new “Blue Print for Energy Policy in Ontario” contains the following excerpts:

They claim Ontario energy policy must be fact-based, cost-effective and transparent

  • To prevent increased costs and delays in implementation, government must ensure that local authorities and processes cannot undermine provincial energy policies, plans and processes.  (Translation:  Stifle public and municipal input)
  •  Government should, in consultation with the energy sector and stakeholders, continue with efforts to streamline approvals processes, ensure that approval processes are applied consistently and fairly, and build community acceptance for new energy projects. (Translation:   Less regulations for wind corporations, more propoganda needed to stifle public/muncipal input and silence dissent)

From the OEA:

Of all energy consumer types, it is the voter who has the loudest voice, and governments listen when that voice speaks.
 
Educating and engaging consumers in an informed and effective conversation are crucial to promoting a stable, fact-based energy policy.  This is especially relevant as the 2011 Ontario election nears.
 
In A Blueprint for Energy Policy in Ontario, the OEA emphasized the need to build social acceptance for energy policies, plans, and projects.  Understanding how to achieve this will be the focus of this year’s OEA Energy Leaders’ Roundtable, entitled The Public in Energy Policy.

Don’t miss out on this opportunity to take part in this important exchange of ideas for promoting the policy stability necessary for Ontario to have sustainable, affordable energy in the 21st century.
 
When:                                                 Tuesday, June 28, 2011
                                                              7:15 a.m. – 12:00 noon

Where:                                                Toronto Reference Library

Program/Registration:                    http://2011energyleadersroundtable.eventbrite.com/

Sponsorship opportunities:         Marg Taggart
                                                             (416) 961-2339 ext. 221
                                                             mtaggart@energyontario.ca

5 thoughts on “Should we laugh or cry? OEA just doesn’t get it

  1. Whoa there – that isn’t the OEB (Ontario Energy Board), it’s the OEA (an association of companies).

    This report had a few useful tidbits, but like the recent Conference Board Report, the idea is really to change the rules to create a need for stuff they can sell. The relationship between big money, big business and big ‘green’ is very strong.

    Not that the OEB has done a great job of representing consumer interest – but they aren’t all in on scamming Ontario’s energy consumers … yet.

  2. Totally understandable.
    I would not have gotten 2 of the letters correct without first having coffee.

  3. The government entity that issues the building permit/permits can be held at least party responsible if a project is later found not to meet safety standards and/or causes bodily harm to people.

    The problem is that the IWT projects are by and large on private property so independent outside inspectors have no way of determing if these projects are safe.

    This is why it is necessay to obtain all the construction plans and inspection reports from the permiting authority. At least the plans can be checked to see if all safety measures were adhered to before operations were allowed to begin.

    There is also the possibility that equipment failed sometime after operations began. But in the interest of PUBLIC SAFETY these issues must be resolved and problems fixed.

    Again read this article!

    http://ecmweb.com/iep/wind-turbine-operation-20110201

    This article addresses IWT safety issues for both workers and the general public.

    • Yahoo News, May 9,2011
      http://news.yahoo.com/s/prweb/20110509/bs_prweb/prweb8391766_2

      “Worker health and safety now paramount for North American Wind Farms”

      “Unlike in established industries where standards have been set,the rules and regulations for health and safety specific to the wind sector are far form clear.”

      Article discusses safety issues in general and who might presently be held responsible for worker safety.

      If workers are not safe around this much electricity then what about the general public who live nearby this much electricity? What about their safety?

  4. With all the lies McGuinty has done over the years, he’s about to put himself in jail over this so call election fraud.

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