Wind turbines threaten swans, says bird expert

Industrial wind farms encroach on Tundra swan habitat, specialist claims
CBC Windsor
A waterfowl specialist says wind turbines could spell danger for Tundra swans and the economy in Lambton County. Dr. Scott Petrie said building industrial wind farms in Grand Bend, Ont., will scare the birds from their annual migration stop. He said the province isn’t considering how the 250 turbines proposed for the area will affect wildlife. “By putting the turbines in inappropriate places, it actually is tantamount to habitat loss. You wouldn’t put an office tower next to a coastal wetland, why would you put a wind turbine there?” he said. Read article

6 thoughts on “Wind turbines threaten swans, says bird expert

  1. TO HELL WITH THE LAWS (ONTARIO LIBERAL GOVERNMENT)
    THESE ARE THE LAWS THAT HAVE BEEN BROKEN JUST IN REGARD TO BIRDS

    The law says: “It is a criminal offense to willfully and without lawful excuse kill, maim, wound, poison or injure a bird, or for anyone to cause or permit unnecessary pain, suffering or injury to a bird. Both wild and domestic birds are protected”.
    This Liberal Government has ignored every law and regulation including health, bird protection, and municipal and individual tights including the Charter of Rights and Freedoms which should be invoked

    GUIDELINE TO ASSIST IN THE REVIEW OF GUIDELINE TO ASSIST IN THE REVIEW OF
    WIND POWER PROPOSALS

    Developed by: Wildlife Section,
    Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources
    Renewable Energy Section
    Potential Impacts to Birds and Bird Habitats
    August 2007
    1.0 Introduction The purpose of this guideline is to ensure that birds and their habitats are considered during the review of proposed wind power projects on Crown land, including consideration of the potential effects on birds during the planning, construction, operation, and decommissioning stages. The specific advice provided in this guideline is intended to complement the document ‘Wind and Water Power Projects in Ontario:
    The Ministry of Natural Resources’ Guide to Coordinated Environmental Approval Processes’. Although this guideline has been developed for bird and bird habitat considerations on Crown land, it will also be used by MNR staff in providing technical advice and recommendations for wind power projects on private land.
    Responsibility for birds and bird habitat is shared by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) and Environment Canada – Canadian Wildlife Service (EC-CWS).
    This guideline:
    • provides a brief overview of the review and approval process for proposed wind power developments;
    • provides a brief summary of the potential impacts of wind power developments on birds;
    • describes federal and provincial legislation and roles and responsibilities related to birds and bird habitat;
    • confirms MNR’s endorsement of EC-CWS’s ‘Wind Turbines and Birds: Guidance Document for Environmental Assessment’ for direction on information and mitigation requirements associated with wind power developments and birds;
    • describes additional considerations related to information and mitigation requirements; and
    • provides a list of potential sources for required information.
    The application of this guideline will be reviewed and updated as required based on the consensus of new information or knowledge.
    It should be considered a living document.
    {In other words McGuinty has no idea about this so called Green Policy affects
    2.0 Overview of Wind Power Review and Approval Process
    The coordinated review and approval process for wind power developments is described in detail in the ‘Wind and Water Power Projects in Ontario: The Ministry of Natural Resources’ Guide to Coordinated Environmental Approval Processes’.
    Depending on the potential facility size (MW), whether electricity generated by a wind turbine will be sold to a third party, and whether wind power potential is being tested or developed, wind power projects on Crown land may be required to obtain a variety of approvals.
    The approvals process for wind power development on Crown land is a two-stage process: the first stage is associated with the testing of wind power potential, and the second stage is associated with the wind power development.
    The approvals required relate to Environmental Assessment (either through MNR’s Class Environmental Assessment for Resource Stewardship and Facility Development, or through the Electricity Projects Regulation Environmental Screening Process), issuance of a Land Use Permit for wind exploration on Crown land, and issuance of a Crown Lease for wind power development on Crown land. To facilitate a coordinated approvals process, MNR’s bird and other wildlife information requirements to support the disposition decision should be addressed during the Environmental Assessment (EA).
    Note the weakness in the following
    Wind power developments may also be proposed on private lands. MNR does not have an approval or disposition role on private land; however, MNR generally acts as a commenting agency during the Environmental Assessment process. Information in this document will be useful for compiling bird information and providing guidance to proponents in addressing MNR comments related to birds and their habitats for wind power developments on private land. Proponents must ensure that full written permission has been obtained from landowners prior to commencing pre- and post- construction surveys and monitoring on private land.
    _ 3.0 Potential Impacts of Wind Power Projects on Birds
    Knowledge of wind power and bird interactions comes from research carried out around theworld. Relatively few studies have been conducted in Canada and Eastern North America. Knowledge gaps remain, particularly with respect to bird migration, disturbance impacts and avoidance, potential attraction to turbine lighting, and the potential impacts of offshore wind development. A detailed summary of the current knowledge of potential impacts of wind power projects on birds can be found in Wind Turbines and Birds: a background review for environmental assessment (EC-CWS 2007).
    Wind power projects have the potential to affect birds directly (i.e. collisions, direct mortality) and indirectly (i.e. disturbance and avoidance). A brief overview of these effects is provided here.
    Direct Effects
    Birds may be injured or killed through collisions with turbine blades and towers, guy wires, meteorological towers, and maintenance vehicles. Mortality may also arise from electrocution or, in night-flying birds, from physical exhaustion associated with lighting-induced disorientation.
    ;WIND POWER PROPOSALS
    Potential Impacts to Birds and Bird Habitats
    August 2007
    Developed by:
    Wildlife Section,
    Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources
    \Renewable Energy Section,
    Ontario Ministry
    1.0 Introduction
    The purpose of this guideline is to ensure that birds and their habitats are considered during the review of proposed wind power projects on Crown land, including consideration of the potential effects on birds during the planning, construction, operation, and decommissioning stages. The specific advice provided in this guideline is intended to complement the document ‘Wind and Water Power Projects in Ontario:
    The Ministry of Natural Resources’ Guide to Coordinated Environmental Approval Processes’. Although this guideline has been developed for bird and bird habitat considerations on Crown land, it will also be used by MNR staff in providing technical advice and recommendations for wind power projects on private land.
    Responsibility for birds and bird habitat is shared by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) and Environment Canada – Canadian Wildlife Service (EC-CWS).
    This guideline:
    • provides a brief overview of the review and approval process for proposed wind power developments;
    • provides a brief summary of the potential impacts of wind power developments on birds;
    • describes federal and provincial legislation and roles and responsibilities related to birds and bird habitat;
    • confirms MNR’s endorsement of EC-CWS’s ‘Wind Turbines and Birds: Guidance Document for Environmental Assessment’ for direction on information and mitigation requirements associated with wind power developments and birds;
    • describes additional considerations related to information and mitigation requirements; and
    • provides a list of potential sources for required information.
    The application of this guideline will be reviewed and updated as required based on the consensus of new information or knowledge.
    It should be considered a living document.
    {In other words McGuinty has no idea about this so called Green Policy affects
    2.0 Overview of Wind Power Review and Approval Process
    The coordinated review and approval process for wind power developments is described in detail in the ‘Wind and Water Power Projects in Ontario: The Ministry of Natural Resources’ Guide to Coordinated Environmental Approval Processes’.
    Depending on the potential facility size (MW), whether electricity generated by a wind turbine will be sold to a third party, and whether wind power potential is being tested or developed, wind power projects on Crown land may be required to obtain a variety of approvals.
    The approvals process for wind power development on Crown land is a two-stage process: the first stage is associated with the testing of wind power potential, and the second stage is associated with the wind power development.
    The approvals required relate to Environmental Assessment (either through MNR’s Class Environmental Assessment for Resource Stewardship and Facility Development, or through the Electricity Projects Regulation Environmental Screening Process), issuance of a Land Use Permit for wind exploration on Crown land, and issuance of a Crown Lease for wind power development on Crown land. To facilitate a coordinated approvals process, MNR’s bird and other wildlife information requirements to support the disposition decision should be addressed during the Environmental Assessment (EA).
    Note the weakness in thefollowing
    Wind power developments may also be proposed on private lands. MNR does not have an approval or disposition role on private land; however, MNR generally acts as a commenting agency during the Environmental Assessment process. Information in this document will be useful for compiling bird information and providing guidance to proponents in addressing MNR comments related to birds and their habitats for wind power developments on private land. Proponents must ensure that full written permission has been obtained from landowners prior to commencing pre- and post- construction surveys and monitoring on private land.
    _ 3.0 Potential Impacts of Wind Power Projects on Birds
    Knowledge of wind power and bird interactions comes from research carried out around theworld. Relatively few studies have been conducted in Canada and Eastern North America. Knowledge gaps remain, particularly with respect to bird migration, disturbance impacts and avoidance, potential attraction to turbine lighting, and the potential impacts of offshore wind development. A detailed summary of the current knowledge of potential impacts of wind power projects on birds can be found in Wind Turbines and Birds: a background review for environmental assessment (EC-CWS 2007).
    Wind power projects have the potential to affect birds directly (i.e. collisions, direct mortality) and indirectly (i.e. disturbance and avoidance). A brief overview of these effects is provided here.
    Direct Effects
    Birds may be injured or killed through collisions with turbine blades and towers, guy wires, meteorological towers, and maintenance vehicles. Mortality may also arise from electrocution or, in night-flying birds, from physical exhaustion associated with lighting-induced disorientation.
    Note the following applies here in total;, No area has the numbers and varieties of birds as fly over this CAW wind turbine site;
    The important factors are: density of birds in the area; landscape features in the area (especially ridges, steep slopes, valleys and landforms such as peninsulas and shorelines that funnel diurnal bird movement); and poor weather conditions.
    The three main factors that contribute to avian mortality at a wind power site ==Appropriate site selection is a key factor in preventing negative impacts on birds. [This is by far the worst location in Ontario]
    Indirect Effects
    Equally important when considering potential adverse effects of wind energy facilities on birds are effects on habitat and behaviour. Birds may be displaced from suitable habitat by wind power projects at any stage in their annual cycle
    Displacement may be due to direct loss of feeding, breeding, or migratory stopover habitat during construction and operation of a facility, or to active avoidance of structures, human activity, infrastructure (e.g., roads, cut forest edges), or noise. T
    The quality of breeding habitat may also be diminished by fragmentation effects (e.g., openings in contiguous habitat to accommodate turbines, transmission lines, and service roads) that may lead to changes in predation and parasitism levels or to adverse impacts on area-sensitive species. The extent of avoidance behaviour is species-specific, and may lead to reduced energy intake through lost feeding opportunities.
    Conversely, for offshore facilities, altered substrate conditions at the bases of turbines may enhance fish and benthic invertebrate populations, and have the potential to increase foraging opportunities for certain species (e.g., waterbirds). This may attract more birds into an area and subsequently increase the incidence of collisions.
    4.0 Relevant Legislation
    4.1 Federal Legislation – Environment Canada (EC)
    Environmental Assessment (EA) under the Canadian Environment Canada is the federal agency responsible for the protection of migratory birds and species at risk (SAR). EC administers the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994 (MBCA) and has responsibilities under the Species at Risk Act.
    a federal Environmental Assessment (EA) under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, EC will provide advice on migratory birds, federal species at risk and other areas related to its mandate on the potential environmental effects of projects on private and public land.
    Note the next section below The Ontario Govrnment does not have a free hand This is Federal and the USA as these birds spend time in the USA Migratory Birds Convention Act (MBCAGeneral description of the MBCA: ]The International Treaty with the United States we are obliged to follow as joint guardiansand caretakers of birds. McGuinty must adhere or face a protest we could initiate]
    Under the Migratory Bird Convention Act, 1994 (MBCA) and its regulations, Environment Canada [EC] has the responsibility to implement the Convention by protecting and conserving migratory birds – as populations and individual birds – and their nests. The Migratory Birds Convention is an international treaty between Canada and the United States that was signed in 1916.
    Migratory Birds protected are listed in Article I of the Convention and Article II identifies conservation principles for the management of migratory birds:
    • to manage birds internationally;
    • to ensure a variety of sustainable uses;
    • to sustain healthy migratory populations for harvesting needs; • to provide for and protect habitat necessary for the conservation of migratory birds;
    • and to restore depleted populations of migratory birds.
    Under the MBCA and regulations, specific prohibitions are in place to address the protection and conservation of migratory birds. They include provisions that forbid:
    • possession of a migratory birds or nest or making it the subject of a commercial transaction
    • the deposit of harmful substances to migratory birds in waters or an area frequented by migratory birds
    • to hunt (kill or harass) a migratory birds
    • to disturb, take or destroy a nest of a migratory bird
    Applicability of the MBCA to Wind Power Projects:
    The MBCA (Section 5) prohibits any person to possess a migratory bird or nest, or buy, sell, exchange or give a migratory bird or nest or make it the subject of a commercial transaction except as authorized by the regulations. Therefore, permits are required for the handling of migratory birds or bird carcasses. The Migratory Bird Regulations (MBR), in Section 6, prohibit the disturbance, destruction, and taking of a nest or egg of a migratory bird; or the possession of a live migratory bird, or its carcass, skin, nest or egg, except under authority of a permit. It is important to note that under the current MBR, no permits can be issued for the incidental take of migratory birds caused by development projects or other economic activities. Section 5.1 of the MBCA also prohibits the deposit of harmful substances to migratory birds in waters or an area frequented by migratory birds or in a place from which the substance may enter such waters or such an area anywhere in Canada and in Canada’s maritime exclusive economic zone.
    Species at Risk Act (SARA)
    The overall goal of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) is to prevent wildlife species from becoming extinct or lost from the wild, and to help in the recovery of species that are at risk as a result of human activities, and to promote stewardship.
    The Act builds on existing laws and programs, such as the Fisheries Act, the Migratory Birds Convention Act, the National Parks Act, the North American Waterfowl Management Plan, as well as the Province’s legislation and programs.
    SARA was proclaimed on June 5, 2003 and is intended to provide protection for individuals of wildlife species at risk listed under Schedule 1 of the Act, their residences (dwelling places, such as a den or nest or other similar area that is occupied or habitually occupied by one or more individuals during part or all of its life cycle) and critical habitat (that part of areas used or formerly used by the species to carry out their life processes that is deemed essential for survival or recovery). Critical habitat will be identified for each listed species in Recovery Strategies or Action Plans.
    The prohibitions under SARA came into force on June 1, 2004 and apply to listed (Schedule 1) endangered and threatened species for all federally protected aquatic species and migratory birds
    v. 1.0 – August, 2007 5Guideline to Assist MNR Staff in the Review of Wind Power Proposals: Potential Impacts to Birds and Bird Habitats(including their residences) found anywhere (i.e. on federal and provincial/ territorial lands), as well as to all endangered and threatened species found on federal lands.
    4.2 Provincial Legislation – Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR)
    The MNR is specifically responsible for all bird species that are not covered under the MBCA. This includes species specifically scheduled in the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act 1997 (FWCA) as game birds, specially protected birds (raptors) and specially protected birds (other than raptors); for species lists, refer to Schedules 3, 7, and 8 of the FWCA. The FWCA protects the nests and eggs of all birds that are wild by nature with the exception of six species that have historically been considered as domestic and/or agricultural nuisances. The FWCA also protects all birds that are wild by nature and that are not game birds from being hunted or trapped (other than the six domestic and/or nuisance species).
    As the steward of provincial Crown land, the MNR shares responsibility with EC for protecting the habitat of federally-protected migratory species.
    As such, proponents will reduce unnecessary delays by working closely with MNR staff throughout the EA process to ensure that all bird- and bird-habitat-related information required by the EC and the MNR is identified in advance and is collected simultaneously. The provincial and federal governments have agreed to cooperate during the EA process, including through the sharing of such information.
    [This has not been done and must be before ithe CAW wind Turbine starts up]
    Relevant legislation overseen by the MNR includes the Public Lands Act, the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Crown Forest Sustainability Act and the Lakes and Rivers Improvement
    Act. Relevant MNR policies include the Wind Power Development on Crown Land Policy (see http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/MNR/EBR/wind_power/ for the policy and directive), and the Provincial Policy Statement (PPS), issued under Section 3 of the Planning Act. The Planning Act applies to municipal planning matters; however MNR may consider the general policy direction of the PPS and the guidance provided by associated documents such as the Natural Heritage Reference manual and the Significant Wildlife Habitat Technical Guide for other types of land use planning, such as Crown land use planning, or EA reviews.
    Regulations issued under Section 28 of the Conservation Authorities Act may apply to birds in the context of wetlands as bird habitat. Proponents should consult with their local Conservation Authority to ensure compliance with these regulations on land under Conservation Authority jurisdiction. [It is]
    The following provincial legislation has relevance to the development of wind power facilities and birds. Aspects of the Acts relating to birds and their habitats, and related policies and guidance material, are highlighted in Table 1.
    The important factors are: density of birds in the area; landscape features in the area (especially ridges, steep slopes, valleys and landforms such as peninsulas and shorelines that funnel diurnal bird movement); and poor weather conditions.
    The three main factors that contribute to avian mortality at a wind power site ==Appropriate site selection is a key factor in preventing negative impacts on birds. [This is by far the worst location in Ontario]
    Indirect Effects
    Equally important when considering potential adverse effects of wind energy facilities on birds are effects on habitat and behaviour. Birds may be displaced from suitable habitat by wind power projects at any stage in their annual cycle
    Displacement may be due to direct loss of feeding, breeding, or migratory stopover habitat during construction and operation of a facility, or to active avoidance of structures, human activity, infrastructure (e.g., roads, cut forest edges), or noise. T
    The quality of breeding habitat may also be diminished by fragmentation effects (e.g., openings in contiguous habitat to accommodate turbines, transmission lines, and service roads) that may lead to changes in predation and parasitism levels or to adverse impacts on area-sensitive species. The extent of avoidance behaviour is species-specific, and may lead to reduced energy intake through lost feeding opportunities.
    Conversely, for offshore facilities, altered substrate conditions at the bases of turbines may enhance fish and benthic invertebrate populations, and have the potential to increase foraging opportunities for certain species (e.g., waterbirds). This may attract more birds into an area and subsequently increase the incidence of collisions.
    4.0 Relevant Legislation
    4.1 Federal Legislation – Environment Canada (EC)
    Environmental Assessment (EA) under the Canadian Environment Canada is the federal agency responsible for the protection of migratory birds and species at risk (SAR). EC administers the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994 (MBCA) and has responsibilities under the Species at Risk Act.
    a federal Environmental Assessment (EA) under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, EC will provide advice on migratory birds, federal species at risk and other areas related to its mandate on the potential environmental effects of projects on private and public land.
    Note the next section below The Ontario Govrnment does not have a free hand This is Federal and the USA as these birds spend time in the USA Migratory Birds Convention Act (MBCA
    General description of the MBCA: ]The International Treaty with the United States we are obliged to follow as joint guardiansand caretakers of birds. McGuinty must adhere or face a protest we could initiate]
    Under the Migratory Bird Convention Act, 1994 (MBCA) and its regulations, Environment Canada [EC] has the responsibility to implement the Convention by protecting and conserving migratory birds – as populations and individual birds – and their nests. The Migratory Birds Convention is an international treaty between Canada and the United States that was signed in 1916.
    Migratory Birds protected are listed in Article I of the Convention and Article II identifies conservation principles for the management of migratory birds:
    • to manage birds internationally;
    • to ensure a variety of sustainable uses;
    • to sustain healthy migratory populations for harvesting needs;
    • to provide for and protect habitat necessary for the conservation of migratory birds;
    • and to restore depleted populations of migratory birds.
    Under the MBCA and regulations, specific prohibitions are in place to address the protection and conservation of migratory birds. They include provisions that forbid:
    • possession of a migratory birds or nest or making it the subject of a commercial transaction
    • the deposit of harmful substances to migratory birds in waters or an area frequented by migratory birds
    • to hunt (kill or harass) a migratory birds
    • to disturb, take or destroy a nest of a migratory bird
    Applicability of the MBCA to Wind Power Projects:
    The MBCA (Section 5) prohibits any person to possess a migratory bird or nest, or buy, sell,exchange or give a migratory bird or nest or make it the subject of a commercial transaction except as authorized by the regulations. Therefore, permits are required for the handling of migratory birds or bird carcasses. The Migratory Bird Regulations (MBR), in Section 6, prohibit the disturbance, destruction, and taking of a nest or egg of a migratory bird; or the possession of a live migratory bird, or its carcass, skin, nest or egg, except under authority of a permit. It is important to note that under the current MBR, no permits can be issued for the incidental take of migratory birds caused by development projects or other economic activities. Section 5.1 of the MBCA also prohibits the deposit of harmful substances to migratory birds in waters or an area frequented by migratory birds or in a place from which the substance may enter such waters or such an area anywhere in Canada and in Canada’s maritime exclusive economic zone.
    Species at Risk Act (SARA)
    The overall goal of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) is to prevent wildlife species from becoming extinct or lost from the wild, and to help in the recovery of species that are at risk as a result of human activities, and to promote stewardship.
    The Act builds on existing laws and programs, such as the Fisheries Act, the Migratory Birds Convention Act, the National Parks Act, the North American Waterfowl Management Plan, as well as the Province’s legislation and programs.
    SARA was proclaimed on June 5, 2003 and is intended to provide protection for individuals ofwildlife species at risk listed under Schedule 1 of the Act, their residences (dwelling places, such as a den or nest or other similar area that is occupied or habitually occupied by one or more individuals during part or all of its life cycle) and critical habitat (that part of areas used or formerly used by the species to carry out their life processes that is deemed essential for survival or recovery). Critical habitat will be identified for each listed species in Recovery Strategies or Action Plans.
    The prohibitions under SARA came into force on June 1, 2004 and apply to listed (Schedule 1) endangered and threatened species for all federally protected aquatic species and migratory birds
    v. 1.0 – August, 2007 5Guideline to Assist MNR Staff in the Review of Wind Power Proposals: Potential Impacts to Birds and Bird Habitats
    (including their residences) found anywhere (i.e. on federal and provincial/ territorial lands), as well as to all endangered and threatened species found on federal lands.
    4.2 Provincial Legislation – Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR)
    The MNR is specifically responsible for all bird species that are not covered under the MBCA. This includes species specifically scheduled in the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act 1997 (FWCA) as game birds, specially protected birds (raptors) and specially protected birds (other than raptors); for species lists, refer to Schedules 3, 7, and 8 of the FWCA. The FWCA protects the nests and eggs of all birds that are wild by nature with the exception of six species that have historically been considered as domestic and/or agricultural nuisances. The FWCA also protects all birds that are wild by nature and that are not game birds from being hunted or trapped (other than the six domestic and/or nuisance species).
    As the steward of provincial Crown land, the MNR shares responsibility with EC for protecting the habitat of federally-protected migratory species.
    As such, proponents will reduce unnecessary delays by working closely with MNR staff throughout the EA process to ensure that all bird- and bird-habitat-related information required by the EC and the MNR is identified in advance and is collected simultaneously. The provincial and federal governments have agreed to cooperate during the EA process, including through the sharing of such information.
    [This has not been done and must be before ithe CAW wind Turbine starts up]
    Relevant legislation overseen by the MNR includes the Public Lands Act, the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Crown Forest Sustainability Act and the Lakes and Rivers Improvement
    Act. Relevant MNR policies include the Wind Power Development on Crown Land Policy (see http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/MNR/EBR/wind_power/ for the policy and directive), and the Provincial Policy Statement (PPS), issued under Section 3 of the Planning Act. The Planning Act applies to municipal planning matters; however MNR may consider the general policy direction of the PPS and the guidance provided by associated documents such as the Natural Heritage Reference manual and the Significant Wildlife Habitat Technical Guide for other types of land use planning, such as Crown land use planning, or EA reviews.
    Regulations issued under Section 28 of the Conservation Authorities Act may apply to birds in the context of wetlands as bird habitat. Proponents should consult with their local Conservation Authority to ensure compliance with these regulations on land under Conservation Authority jurisdiction.
    [It is]
    The following provincial legislation has relevance to the development of wind power facilities and birds. Aspects of the Acts relating to birds and their habitats, and related policies and guidance material, are highlighted in Table 1.
    Table 1. Summary of provincial legislation under MNR authority that is relevant to birds and their habitats in relation to wind power projects. Legislation
    Relevance to Birds
    Public Lands Act

    • So – again,
      Question:
      Is the Green Energy and Green Economy Act (Bill 150) –
      ‘illegal’, or is it – ‘Ultra Virus’ – ?.

    • it depends –
      is she pregnant?…..and on leave – therefore out of office?
      or maybe – working from home?…..but , has ‘heartburn’?
      Oh – the questions!

      • Well,if someone’s breaking the LAW,who do you call? Ghost Busters? RCMP? SAS? CAS? Buffy the McGuinty slayer?
        Someone has to up hold it……

        I haven’t got much wall left!

  2. Now there is a cause for the CBC! Saving birds.

    Defend Conservative Voters whose lives have been ruined? Nope! Not consistent with Progressive Thinking and CBC Core Values of Hiding the Decline (In Ethics).

    We need the turbines placed in Liberal Ridings to get the CBC to pay attention… as if that day will come. 🙁

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