A “Receptor” speaks

Wellington Advertiser
I am tired of WPD Canada and the whole wind industry referring to me and my farm as a “receptor” when they talk about the impact that I will be feeling from the noise and shadow flicker produced by their turbines.

This choice of a dehumanizing label is a deliberate attempt by the industry to hide that fact that their machines directly impact people.  So, in taking a page from their book, I will now be referring to the persons and the turbines perpetrating this disaster to the neighbourhood as the “inflictor”.

Robert Service, Belwood, Ontario

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15 Responses to A “Receptor” speaks

  1. David Libby says:

    A quick lookup of dehumanization, type it into search:
    http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-dehumanization.htm
    Political leaders often seek out methods to override their citizens’ objections in order to gain support for their cause. One such method of public manipulation is called dehumanization. Dehumanization is the deliberate removal of sympathetic human traits when referring to members of an opposing ideology, race, political party or other source of conflict. Adolf Hitler’s references to Jews as ‘vermin’ or ‘rats’ is one example of dehumanization in action.

    Convincing an average citizen to commit a violent act or to murder a fellow human being is extremely difficult. Our moral code tells us that such acts are immoral and indefensible. However, through the skillful use of dehumanization, leaders throughout history have succeeded in doing just that. Once the enemy has been stripped of humanity and becomes an object worthy of punishment, the idea of mistreating or even destroying this threat becomes morally justifiable.

    Dehumanization often begins with the removal of personal identification. A convicted criminal is issued a prison identification number, for example. Or an inadamate label “receptor”

    • David Libby says:

      Countermeasure

      http://na-paw.org/pr-120128.php
      The Invisible Children Meet Big Wind

      In a bid to give a voice to the thousands of people who suffer in their health from the vicinity to wind turbines, the North American Platform Against Wind Power (NA-PAW) presents to the public twelve-year-old Jordynn Stom, whose already delicate health is being threatened by a wind farm project.

    • barbara says:

      Label people as objects and not humans so they can then be treated as objects.

      • Peter says:

        David
        I am not sure of how one calculates the underage (18) children stats for South Western Ontario,but you would have to include towns now (as CAW has set a president)
        This gives a rough idea of population around here,thanks to the Bullet http://huron.bulletnewscanada.ca/2012/02/09/population-in-most-huron-county-municipalities-declines-stats-can/

        and then there is the mandate from the Child and Youth Ministry. Large conflict of Mcdaltons idea’s

        Mandate and Scope
        Mission Statement

        http://www.children.gov.on.ca/htdocs/English/index.aspx
        The Office of the Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth serves youth in state care and the margins of state care through individual, systemic and policy advocacy. The Office strives, at every level of its operation to be an exemplar of youth participation.

        Principles
        •The principle of empowerment for children and youth
        •The principle of respect for the dignity of children and youth, and to their right to be heard.
        •The principle of the family as the primary source of nurturance, support and advocacy for children and youth.
        •The principle of equality for all children and youth and the principle of respect for diversity.
        •The principle of the least adversarial approach to finding solutions for children, youth and their families.
        •The principle of the community’s collective responsibility for providing resources and services to children, youth and their families.
        •The principle of a system that is responsive to the needs of children, youth and their families.
        •The principle of community outreach as an ongoing process.
        *The practice statements listed under each principle are to be understood as examples of how a principle may be operationlized and as such are not to be seen as an exhaustive list of practice principles.

        The principle of empowerment for children and youth.
        In practice, this means:

        •Supporting children, youth and their families in advocating for themselves.
        •Ensuring that all advocacy activities are carried out with respect for the wishes and consent of children, youth and their families.
        •Informing children, youth and families of their rights and entitlements.
        The principle of respect for the dignity of children and youth, and to their right to be heard.
        In practice, this means:

        •Listening to the child/youth with dignity, respect and in confidence.
        •Voicing the child/youth’s concerns when they feel no one is listening
        •Modelling and communicating this principle as a basic right of children and youth and as fundamental to the development of skills that children and youth need in order to make healthy choices as they mature.
        •Recognizing that children, youth and families, as consumers of service, offer a unique and valuable perspective in defining and solving problems.
        •Ensuring that procedures and processes are built into the system for addressing concerns and reassuring children and youth that these processes are available to them.
        The principle of the family as the primary source of nurturance, support and advocacy for children and youth.
        In practice, this means:

        •Supporting families in advocating for their children.
        •Involving family members in the advocacy process (to the greatest extent possible).
        The principle of equality for all children and youth and the principle of respect for diversity.
        In practice, this means:

        •Embracing respect for the intrinsic worth of all individuals
        •Maintaining a professional relationship with children, youth and their families based on mutually defined goals, shared responsibility and appropriate self awareness
        •Serving children, youth and their families by appreciating the significance of race, ethnicity, language, religion, marital status, gender, sexual orientation, age, abilities, economic status, political affiliation or national ancestry.
        The principle of the least adversial approach to finding solutions for children, youth and their families.
        In practice, this means:

        •Beginning with the least intrusive intervention, recognizing that certain cases may require more immediate action.
        •Respecting the roles and responsibilities of all parties involved, i.e. service providers, government ministries, children, youth and their families.
        •Maintaining open lines of communication with all parties involved.
        The principle of the community’s collective responsibility for providing resources and services to children, youth and their families.
        In practice, this means:

        •Facilitating access to services and resources for children, youth and their families.
        •Maintaining an information base on current community resources.
        •Directing children, youth and families to appropriate resources in their communities.
        •Facilitating community organization to ensure collaborative and effective case management across service sectors.
        The principle of a system that is responsive to the needs of children, youth and their families.
        In practice, this means:

        •Encouraging agencies, government ministries and service providers to acknowledge and respond to the concerns presented by children, youth and their families.
        •Ensuring community action as it relates to hard to serve cases.
        •Establishing and maintaining relationships with appropriate community groups that service or represent specialized interests and/or populations (i.e. ethnocultural/ethnoracial or religious groups)
        •Committing to organizational change as it relates to the Advocacy Office’ practice of conducting system reviews.
        •Collecting data outlining client concerns, recognize gaps in service and influence policy change through direct contact with ministry staff.
        The principle of community outreach as an ongoing process.
        In practice, this means:

        •Establishing and maintaining ongoing relationships with a variety of natural community advocates.
        •Providing presentations to agencies and/or community groups with respect to children’s rights and the role of the Office of Child and Family Service Advocacy.

      • barbara says:

        The population density per sq.km is still too high for the installation of IWTs to in any way be considered “safe”. The numbers of IWTs planned will overwhelm the area. The farm animal population must also be considered when it comes to their health and safety issues.
        Destroy both the people and the animals. IWT effects are felt way beyond a sq. km.

      • barbara says:

        Wikipedia has the 2006 census data for the Ontario counties and towns with the population per sq.km. The census 2011 data is out for some areas for example Essex Co. Essex Co. and some others are at:
        http://www.citypopulation.de/Canada-Ontario.html

  2. Peter says:

    We need a rouges gallery.
    Pictures and names of all involved in GEA,whether Politician,so far namless QP buerocrats,naysay doctors,CEO’s,and there associates and engineers Lib President etc
    So it stays up on the net to haunt the Inflictors to their graves.

    • Andrew Hoag says:

      That sounds like a very good idea!

      • Peter says:

        Thanks
        There is a photo on the website Child and Youth Ministry of the (Anus Minister) that is basically letting MOE kill and harm our children. CANWEA associates do not need a permit for that!

  3. Sparky says:

    I agree with Peter.. Publish a list of names and pictures of all the politicians, ESPECIALLY the nameless bureaucrats(for it is they that make the policy) and all involved with promoting the GEA..And yes, keep it posted and updated on a regular basis..The public has the right to know who is screwing them, IMHO..

    • Peter says:

      Your a Diamond!

      • Peter says:

        Let’s get the camara’s out and get pic’s of the project managers..the sound testing guys,the bird watches study guys etc that are at the (open houses,information meetings) the councillors in conflict etc.

        As someone said, no violence,but we can sure do damage by publishing and naming and shaming forever the child harmers (I guess in some situations Judges would say abuse!)
        At least the niehbours will know in the city’s who they are living next to eh..hydro hikers and people harmers………animals, bird killers etc

  4. p says:

    I’m glad someone wrote about the feelings of a “receptor” It feels horrible.so does having your community renamed the Gand Renewable Energy Park, or Summerhaven or any other number of names. No-one asked us and these are our communities. There is not a word in the English language that can describe the living nightmare this has brought to rural area residents in Ontario.

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