How to destroy crown land: just add wind turbines

Ministry of Natural Resources

  • The Ministry of Natural Resources has launched a review of its policy approach to renewable energy development on Crown land including water power, on-shore wind and solar power development.
  • As part of the review, a draft policy has been posted to the Environmental Registry – registry # 011-6005. The draft policy includes direction on how the ministry would manage Crown land for renewable energy in a manner reflecting Ontario’s long term energy plans and programs, and balancing the social, economic and ecological interests of the Province.
  • Once complete, the policy will provide a basis for procedural direction for renewable energy development on Crown land.

The focus of the review will include:

  • a framework and criteria to support future decisions on where Crown land should be made available for renewable energy, including alignment with provincial energy plans and programs on supply mix and transmission priorities;
  • direction on how Crown land would be made available for renewable energy;
  • the approach to Crown land management for renewable energy and Aboriginal economic development; and
  • policy alignment with the Far North Act and other provincial direction;
  • the use of science and information to support Crown land decisions for renewable energy.

Please click the following link to view a four page introduction to the policy review process (pdf, 658 KB) which briefly outlines why policy direction is being reviewed, what will be included in the review, and how to get involved.

The draft Renewable Energy on Crown Land policy is posted on the Environmental Registry registry # 011-6005 for public, stakeholder and Aboriginal community comment.

7 thoughts on “How to destroy crown land: just add wind turbines

  1. Pingback: Draft Agenda For EIB Meeting (8-6-12) | Sandia Tea Party

  2. One of the key criteria for wind farms, aside from wind should be aesthetic considerations. Logging companies in the past have had to leave shoreline and skyline reserves of forest for the benefit of water travelers. In keeping with this theory of preserving Ontario’s rich natural visual heritage, such sky machines should be kept completely out of sight in areas of high tourism activity or potential activity.
    They are pretty to some, but not all. Nobody likes a diminished holiday experience or ruined photo op when a sacred shoreline or mountain becomes an industrial farm. Imagine the Sleeping Giant covered with windmills. Now extrapolate that image all along the spectacular shore of Lake Superior. Ask anyone who has driven across Canada what the most visually exciting stretch of highway was.

  3. Policy ‘Let’s Gut Ontario’ – The Climate Group!
    Bringing closure –
    Mr. McGuinty does this for a living – along with helpful mayors and CAO’s

    ‘[excerpt] The draft policy includes direction on how the ministry would manage Crown land for renewable energy in a manner reflecting Ontario’s long term energy plans and programs, and balancing the social, economic and ecological interests of the Province.
    Once complete, the policy will provide a basis for procedural direction for renewable energy development on Crown land.’

    ‘[excerpt] policy alignment with the Far North Act and other provincial direction;
    the use of science and information to support Crown land decisions for renewable energy.’

    A Monster!

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