Wind subsidies gone, Samsung gone

Toronto Sun, Jennifer Bieman and Megan Stacey
The loss of 340 jobs at a factory that makes blades for wind turbines could be harbinger of troubles ahead in Ontario’s green-energy industry, a leading analyst says.

Siemens Canada announced Tuesday it’s closing its Tillsonburg plant, one of four Ontario green-energy factories set up under a controversial, multi-billion-dollar deal with Korean industrial giant Samsung.

The closing of one of the town’s largest employers came after weeks of nervous speculation.

But energy analyst Tom Adams said Ontario’s green-energy industry could be in for a rough ride if it doesn’t lay its hands on orders from outside Ontario, arguing the provincial market is saturated with wind and solar electricity brought online since the Liberal government plunged headlong into green energy in 2009.

“I think it was always pretty obvious that whatever jobs were going to arise from the Green Energy Act were all temporary or almost all temporary,” Adams said, referencing the provincial law that paved the way for big wind farms in Ontario under contracts paying energy giants more than consumers pay for power.

“Samsung had no history in renewable energy before they came to Ontario. They came only for the subsidies, and when the subsidies dry up, they’ll disappear as quick as they landed,” said Adams, an independent energy and environmental advisor and researcher. Read article

The Green Job “Joke” in Ontario

“Green Jobs” have always been a bit of a joke. Although not a very funny one.

Back in 2010 McGuinty signed a deal with South Korean company Samsung, and promised Ontarians that all kinds of employment would flow from it.

The Liberal government ended months of speculation in September when it confirmed it was in talks with Samsung about a project that could create about 15,000 jobs.

Ontario’s manufacturing sector has shed hundreds of thousands of jobs in the recession. The deal with Samsung would likely be the linchpin in McGuinty’s push for renewable sources of energy and his plan to create 50,000 jobs. CBC, 2010

The numbers were highly inflated in that press release. Even Samsung’s website could only cough up minuscule (although inconsistent) numbers.

Thanks to Samsung’s Green Energy Investment Agreement with the Government of Ontario, we are creating 9,000 jobs, kick-starting a new industry in Ontario and generate 1,369 megawatts of clean energy. Samsung Renewable Energy

Samsung and Pattern Energy’s wind power projects in Ontario are creating more than 1,000 jobs Samsung Renewable Energy, 2014

Our investments will create 900 direct renewable energy manufacturing jobs and 9,000 high-skilled jobs in Ontario. Samsung Renewable Energy, 2014

Down down down the number fell! We went from a promised 15,000 Samsung jobs in 2010, to a possible 900 in 2014? So what is the real number? I suppose nobody is really counting anymore. The fact is the province blatantly lied to the people of Ontario just so this juicy deal could be pushed through without much fuss. One would think the opposition parities would do as much as they could to investigate WHY this deal had to be made… Continue reading

Ontario gov’t ignored chance to cut $1.5B in hydro bills: documents

CTV News
Newly unearthed documents suggest Ontario’s Liberal government could have saved hydro customers $1.5 billion by terminating an agreement with Samsung, but decided against it.

The papers, uncovered by Progressive Conservative Finance Critic Vic Fedeli, relate to the 2009 Samsung green energy agreement that would take $10.5 billion from Ontario hydro bills, and pay it to a Samsung consortium over 20 years. In return, Samsung would deliver green energy and build factories in the province, employing 900 people.

Four years into the deal, however, a confidential document from staff at the Ministry of Energy advised the government it could save hydro customers $5.2 billion by terminating the agreement. This was because the Korean consortium was missing contract targets and deadlines on electricity projects that Ontario didn’t even need anymore.

But instead of calling off the deal, the Liberals renegotiated the contract to save only $3.7 billion –leaving $1.5 billion in hydro savings on the table.

“Even though we don’t need the power, and even though we can get out of this for nothing, (the Liberals) already told the public how important this deal is,” Fedeli told CTV Toronto, suggesting that the government ignored the potential savings “just to save face.” Read article

Defunct Wind Turbines to be dismantled on Sable Island

Sable Island – such a ridiculous place to even think of putting wind turbines, but the Feds went ahead and did it. Canadian Press describes how the turbines never really did anything… they were dead from the get go.

“The harsh conditions and extreme isolation of Sable Island have forced Ottawa to abandon a wind project on the iconic crescent-shaped sandbar — more than 15 years after it launched the initiative. Parks Canada said wind turbines don’t meet the needs of the wind-swept Nova Scotia island, famous for the wild horses that have roamed there since the 18th century.”

“When asked for the total cost of the project to date, Environment Canada said just under $1 million had been spent on the project as of 2006. It will cost another $150,000 to decommission the turbines, it said. The original budget for the wind project was $669,000.”

“Parks Canada said it hopes to develop “a reduced facility footprint, more efficient operations, reduced electricity demand, and renewable power generation” on Sable. The decommissioning will happen in two phases: The battery and switch gear were removed in 2015, and the towers and turbines are scheduled to be dismantled and removed this fall, Parks Canada said.”


It’s news that they are taking the turbines down, but it isn’t news that the damn things never worked. Here’s a CBC story from 2011. Remember – components started arriving at the island to be assembled way back in 2002. By 2011 they still weren’t producing power for the island!

“Officials estimate it will cost another $660,000 to refurbish or replace what is now aging or obsolete equipment. It took years to assemble, secure and properly connect the five towers that now hold the wind turbines. In the summer of 2005, just after the turbines were hooked up and generating power, a piece of equipment called the inverter malfunctioned.”

“Environment Canada said in an email to CBC News that “during commissioning, it was discovered that a manufacturing defect —improper software — resulted in improper currents, and some transistors were damaged.” Even though the damaged equipment was replaced and the proper software installed not long after the test, the system remains offline.

“Although the wind turbines are generating electricity … other improvements are needed to create a system that effectively uses the electrical power generated by the turbines,” said Environment Canada spokesperson Mark Johnson. Environment Canada said it has completed an assessment of the entire system to determine whether any of it needs replacement.”
———

It was broken. They tried to fix it and it still didn’t work. So they just let it all rot away, because – thank God! – they had diesel generators going the whole time!

Another Statewide Blackout: South Australia’s Wind Power Disaster Continues

sa-28-sep-16Stop These Things
Thanks to its ludicrous attempt to run on sunshine and breezes, South Australia has just experienced yet another Statewide blackout. SA’s vapid Premier, Jay Weatherill and what passes for media in this Country ran straight to the periphery, blaming everything except the bleeding obvious (see this piece of infantile doodling from wind cult central – the ABC).

STT’s SA operatives tell us the blackout occurred during a blustery spring storm (heavy rain, lightning and surging, gusty wind). The power supply went down across the entire State at precisely the same time (a little after 3:30pm). It took more than 5 hours to restore power to a few parts of the State, and many regions remained powerless for much longer than that.

True it was that lines were damaged in the mid-North around Port Augusta, but that doesn’t explain why the whole State’s supply went down. Grids are designed with with a level of redundancy, and to avoid complete collapses by isolating damaged sections, in order to keep the balance up and running.

For those truly interested in the cause, what appears in the graph above – care of Aneroid Energy – gives a clue as to the culprit.

SA’s 18 wind farms have a combined (notional) capacity of 1,580MW.

On 28 September (aka ‘Black Wednesday’), as the wind picked up, output surges by around 900MW, from a trifling 300MW (or 19% of installed capacity) to around 1,200MW.

As we explain below, electricity grids were never designed to tolerate that kind of chaos, but it’s what occurs in the hour before the collapse that matters. Read article

How Ontario’s Liberals bungled the green energy file

Dalton green dreamJon W. Kieran, National Post
Ontario set an all-time peak electricity demand of 27,005 megawatts (MW) 10 years ago this summer. At the time, rising demand and plans to retire its coal-fired power plants dominated provincial energy policy. What followed was optimism for a new energy policy, focused on the ambitious procurement of large wind and solar installations. I felt great pride in helping to lead an industry that would make Ontario’s power system clean, responsive and cutting edge.

What a difference a decade makes. Intrusive policy and poor implementation are largely responsible for the energy market debacle Ontarians face today. But there is no excuse now for buying more mega-projects when our power supply is saturated and hydro bills are skyrocketing.

Coal-fired power generation effectively disappeared after 2010, by which time Ontario’s electricity demand had already started to plummet. Demand has fallen 13 per cent in the past 10 years, including consecutive reductions in each of the past five years. In 2016, Ontario will consume less electricity than in 1997.

Peak demand exceeded 23,000 MW only one day this summer, despite parts of the province seeing 35 days with temperatures above 30 C. Yet our installed capacity approaches 40,000 MW. The system will have reserves above extreme summer peaks well into the 2020s. The Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) reinforced this point recently when it confirmed “Ontario will have sufficient supply for the next several years.” Read article

Ontario’s Liberals have completely broken the electricity system

The Hamilton Spectator - Editorial Cartoon by Graeme MacKay

The Hamilton Spectator – Editorial Cartoon by Graeme MacKay

Finally – the Globe and Mail gets it!

The Globe and Mail, Editorial
In politics, as we wrote Wednesday, people get upset about the little things. Remember Bev Oda’s $16 glass of orange juice? In the context of a 12-figure federal budget, or ministerial trips justifiably running into the tens of thousands of dollars, some overpriced OJ hardly mattered. And yet it galled. Small misdeeds are relatable. A big, complicated and massively costly government screw-up, in contrast, sometimes leaves people cold.

Let’s see if this warms you up. On Wednesday, Ontario’s Auditor-General announced that, between 2006 and 2014, thanks to incompetence and mismanagement on the part of the province’s Liberal government, Ontarians overpaid for electricity to the tune of $37-billion. And over the next 18 years, consumers will be overpaying to the tune of another $133-billion.

Let’s try to put those numbers in context. Electricity overpriced by $170-billion is equivalent to $12,326 in excess costs for every man, woman and child in Ontario. Over 27 years, that averages out to $457 per person, per year. According to Statistics Canada, the average Ontario household has 2.6 people, so for the typical family, we’re talking about a power utility bill roughly $1,188 higher than it should be – every year. Read article

Ontario considers mandatory home energy ratings before selling property

Funny how it only goes one way – residents are always in the wrong, wasting energy. Maybe they should apply the same ‘audits’/scrutiny to say… inefficient wind turbines? That would ruin the industry…

CTV News
CTV News ha211586-a-house-for-sale-hasreduced-price-signs learned the Ontario government is considering making home energy audits mandatory before posting a property for sale. The energy audits would pinpoint spots where homes waste heat and electricity. The property would be given a rating number similar to what consumers see on home appliances.

The government is working on a plan that would not force sellers to pay the $350 cost of the audit. The government is looking at possibly using revenue from the Cap and Trade carbon taxes to subsidize the audits. Ontario Energy Minister Bob Chiarelli says that creating mandatory audits would be “about reducing emissions.”

“It’s about a healthier planet and healthier communities because it will result in significant emission reductions,” Chiarelli said. The executive director of the Windfall Ecology Centre, Brent Kopperson, says that making audits mandatory would be a benefit to the consumer.

“It gives you the opportunity to compare one home to another with respect to its energy usage and cost,” Kopperson said. However, there is concern that a low rating could stigmatize a home, lowering its value. But home owners would be given the opportunity to make changes to their home and have it re-evaluated. Read article

Metrolinx pulls plug on Lisgar GO station wind turbine: produced 91% less electricity than projected

throw money ladder windMississauga MetroNews
Metrolinx has packed up its 31-metre-tall wind turbine at the Lisgar GO Station after it produced 91 per cent less electricity than projected.

The provincial transportation agency has officially dumped a pilot project aimed at creating renewable energy using a $620,000 wind turbine.  Unveiled in 2009, the turbine was slated to produce enough energy to power 80 per cent of the Lisgar GO station’s electricity per year – 98,550 kilowatt hours (kWh). It fell far short of its targets, producing less than ten per cent of that.

“These things are sometimes difficult to predict. It was based on educated estimates and, as it turns out, they were lower than anticipated,” said Metrolinx media relations manager Anne Marie Aikins.

Metrolinx staff began taking down the structure in July, finishing sometime in August.  Aikins said it has since been sold. Read article

Solar company sues Ontario Power Authority for $9 million

BentleyDonovan Vincent, The Star
An Ottawa company that participated in a provincial program helping homeowners and farmers develop renewable energy projects is suing the Ontario Power Authority for $9 million, claiming it lost hundreds of customers and was forced to lay off all its employees after the OPA retroactively reduced fees paid out under the plan.

The claim, which the province disputes, relates to the government’s microFIT program, an ongoing initiative introduced by Ontario’s Energy Ministry in 2009. The program was launched to encourage homeowners, farmers, small businesses and institutions to produce small renewable energy projects.
These owners are paid for the electricity they produce, and the prices are set to enable them to recover their costs and earn a “reasonable return” over a 20-year period.

According to court documents, Capital Solar Power Corp. says it expended “vast sums of money” and time recruiting participants for the program, and in September 2011 saw about 275 of them apply for microFIT. Read article

Power prices zap Ontario’s oil gains

wynneFinancial Post, Parker Gallant
According to the Globe and Mail, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne says her province “is ready to shield Canada from the economic tsunami caused by declining oil prices and a sinking dollar.”

Ms. Wynne’s comments came after an RBC report estimated the fall in oil prices will actually help the Canadian economy by boosting household purchasing power by $8.9 billion this year. With annual Ontario gasoline consumption of 16.4 billion litres, a permanent slide in the price of about 25 cents (from $1.20 a litre to 95 cents a litre) should translate to about $4-billion annually in the hands of Ontario consumers.

Premier Wynne went on to say: “I don’t wish for low oil prices and a low dollar for Alberta,” she said. “But at the same time, we want our manufacturing sector to rebound. So if that [low oil price] helps, then that’s a good thing.”

If lower oil prices are a good thing, what can the premier say about the higher electricity prices she is responsible for? Ms. Wynne cannot have it both ways. The cut in gasoline prices, in fact, will only replace a portion of the cash the Liberal government’s Green Energy & Green Economy Act (GEA) annually extracts from consumers on their electricity bills. If one goes back to 2009 when the GEA was passed into law and compare the price of electricity with today’s prices, the hit to Ontario’s ratepayers (including manufacturers) is about $4.5 billion per year. Read article

Ontario Liberals to pay back $10,000 in relation to gas plant scandal. Just $999.99-million to go

Dalton GasNational Post, Robyn Urback
Last week, the Ontario Liberal Party said it would reimburse taxpayers for the $10,000 it paid a computer expert to allegedly wipe computer hard drives in the premier’s office. Sorry, the Liberals said. Our bad. Police are in the process of investigating the matter, and so the office of Premier Kathleen Wynne conceded that taxpayers probably shouldn’t get dinged for these seemingly nefarious expenses. And that’s absolutely correct; everyone knows that honest governments should foot the bills for their own alleged cover-ups.

The $10,000 from the government originally went to IT consultant Peter Faist, who is the spouse of former Ontario premier Dalton McGuinty’s deputy chief of staff. According to police, Faist was hired by David Livingston, McGuinty’s chief of staff, to delete information from approximately 20 government computers relating to the cancellation of two gas plants in Mississauga and Oakville, which cost the province upwards of $1.1-billion. Faist did not have security clearance to access the computers, nor did he have an actual contract for the work from what he told police. That said, according to the Liberals, no one thought Faist was doing anything wrong. Read article

Rise in utility disconnections ‘unacceptable’: MPP

electricity costBy Denis Langlois, Sun Times, Owen Sound
MPP Bill Walker says he is deeply concerned about the skyrocketing number of people who are appealing to the local United Way for help after having their electricity or heating services cut off by utility companies or because they are at risk of a disconnection.

The Bruce-Grey-Owen Sound Progressive Conservative politician said increasing hydro rates, which he blames on Ontario Liberal government mismanagement, and a lack of jobs in the province are behind the troublesome trend. “Sadly, I think we’re going to have more and more disconnections,” he said Thursday in an interview. “It’s unacceptable.”

Francesca Dobbyn, executive director of the United Way of Bruce Grey, told The Sun Times Wednesday that the agency has received more calls this fall — the bulk of which have come in within the last few weeks — about service disconnections than in any other year of its eight-year-old utility assistance program. Read article

Mclean’s Mountain wind project operates half a year and GE is already doing warranty repairs on the blades

turbinebladeManitoulin Expositor
MCLEAN’S MOUNTAIN—During the Sunday of Thanksgiving weekend, Dr. Joe Shorthouse and his wife Marilyn spotted two orange specks high above the landscape, dangling precariously from the tip of one of the massive McLean’s Mountain wind farm turbine blades and snapped the accompanying heart racing photos. Dr. Shorthouse said they sat mesmerized by the duo for half an hour before carrying on and were eager to share the photos with this newspaper.

When asked about the work late last week, Paul Kaminski, project manager, Northland Power, explained that the workers were performing warranty work on the blade serrations. (Look closely at the photo and one can see that the blades are indeed serrated, like a steak knife). “This means that some of the serrations did not fully meet General Electric’s (GE) quality specifications and required an additional touch up as part of warranty,” Mr. Kaminski explained. Read article

Wind turbines blowing Ontario taxpayers’ money: Report

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Toronto Sun, Antonella Artuso
TORONTO — Wind turbines are sucking money out of Ontarians’ wallets, a new report says. What Goes Upa Fraser Institute report by Ross McKitrick and Tom Adams to be released Thursday, makes a number of controversial recommendations to ease the upward pressure on electricity bills.

The Ontario government should announce an immediate moratorium on new wind and solar power facilities, and revisit existing contracts that commit Ontarians to paying well above market rates for renewable electricity, the authors conclude.

“Wind and solar power systems provide less than 4% of Ontario’s power but account for 20% of the cost paid by Ontarians, yet the government wants to triple the number of wind and solar generators,” energy analyst Adams said in a statement. “That’s a good deal for wind and solar producers but a raw deal for consumers.” Read article

Farmers object to wind turbines, survey says

animal wind farmFarmers Forum
LONDON — The debate over wind turbines in Western Ontario is generating some lively opinions among farmers with a clear majority strongly opposed, a Farmers Forum survey suggests. A random survey of 50 farmers at the London Farm Show on March 5, found that 58 % disapproved of wind turbines.

Just 20 % of survey respondents approved and 22 % were neutral on the issue. Among those who had an opinion, farmers opposed to turbines outnumbered those who approved by almost three-to-one. Almost 80 % of those who disapprove believe the wind turbines are too costly and are an inefficient source of electricity.

“The capital cost of erecting the wind turbine in the first place is far in excess of what I would think a reasonable return on the investment would be in terms of the energy that is generated by one of those,” said Harold Jackson, a cash crop farmer from Middlesex County. “I don’t believe the economics are there; this is a money grab,” said a Brant County cash crop farmer who noted that he has worked near wind turbines. “I believe there are health issues. I don’t care what the experts say. Read article

One solar panel can’t connect to grid, but over 100 wind turbines can…

CTV News
It was a $100,000 investment in a greener future, but four-years after Rita Van Geffen invested her retirement savings into a ground mount solar panel, she’s only now seeing a return and not the kind she was looking for.

In April 2010, Van Geffen invested in a solar panel, which has yet to be connected to the grid. “It’s doing absolutely nothing. I can’t get it connected,” she says. “I believed in green energy and I thought it was a good return on my money.” Read article

CTV solar

Dim Dippers

andrea_horwathTom Adams Energy
Ontario’s NDP are now trying to position themselves as defenders of the province’s battered electricity consumers. The NDP’s concerns are getting lots of news headlines like this and this and this, but the solutions the Dippers propose deserve more scrutiny.

Ontario’s NDP latest energy pronouncements remain mired in the confusion they have added to Ontario’s energy file. The NDP have been stalwart supporters of the Liberal’s Green Energy Act, so it is a bit rich for them to now complain about the rate increases that ugly legislation is causing.

Do the NDP propose to expand or not expand wind and solar power? If they want more wind power, who will they be pushing their turbines on? These questions remain unanswered.

To the extent that the NDP claim to address the root cause of Ontario’s rates increases, energy critic Peter Tabuns argues that “Ontario has signed costly deals with private power companies that have created a glut in supply that must be exported at a lower price than the generation cost.”       Read article

P.E.I. arenas say their new wind turbines an expensive ‘burden,’ want them removed

PEINational Post
Several Prince Edward Island rinks that were convinced to make the expensive conversion to wind power, but never saw the promised savings, are now trying to get rid of the trouble-plagued turbines and win compensation for their troubles.

“We went into debt to purchase this windmill on the promise that it would make us money and it would help us with our power costs,” said Tom Albrecht, vice-president of the South Shore Actiplex in Crapaud, P.E.I., which spent $70,000 and received another $230,000 from the federal and provincial governments to install a turbine.

“The bottom line is buy us out and give us our money back.”

Last week, the Wind Energy Institute of Canada apparently decided to shut down turbines at at least some of the rinks, as it worked through technical problems, according to Darin Craig, past president of the South Shore Actiplex board. Read article

Residents fear turbines will impact gas wells

natural gas crude oilBy Amanda Moore, Niagara this Week
WEST LINCOLN — All Anne Fairfield and Ed Engel want for Christmas is to see the turbines near their rural home ordered down. The West Lincoln couple has filed an appeal to the province’s approval of the HAF Wind Energy Project based on the Canadian Charter of Rights of Freedoms. The couple claims the province’s approval of the project is in direct conflict with their right to enjoy their property.

While they wait for decisions on two Charter appeals currently before the Environmental Tribunal, they watch in fear as work continues on the five turbine project. The couple’s most immediate concerns relate to the installation of distribution lines near a known gas well. “This is where the danger lies,” said Fairfield. “This case has reached a point where the health and safety of a very densely populated rural area of West Lincoln and Hamilton is threatened if no immediate action is taken.” Read article

Fact-based Perspective on the Green Energy Act

Town of Blue Mountains Mayor and Council,
Please refer to the chart (provided by Bill Palmer).  These data are rock-solid, as provided / published by the IESO. Please refer to my comments below. The message is simple and easy to understand.

output Palmer

Between the years  2000 and 2012 coal use (black curve) was reduced from about 42 TWh to about 4 TWh, a reduction of about 39 TWh.

Wind Power (terra cotta curve, lower right) has contributed essentially nothing to reducing Ontario’s coal use. (How could that small amount of wind, only about 4TWh even in 2012, possibly have replaced 39 TWh of coal???) Continue reading

Ontario’s latest electricity scheme: Pumped energy storage

USACE_Seneca_Pumped_Storage_CloseupFinancial Post
As the Ontario government’s $1-billion gas plant relocation scandal slips into history, the province’s electricity ratepayers should not assume that the era of big-ticket rate-boosting power projects of questionable value is a thing of the past. Now comes the “Smart Grid” and a host of other projects.

Smart Grid is the new fad taking over power industry policy everywhere — it’s a flexible concept that gives utilities, contractors and governments room to justify ratepayer spending on “Smart Meters,” electric cars, power line automation and the new hot idea of electricity storage.

None of these ideas comes cheap, including pumped electricity storage, a plan making its way through the province’s electric industrial complex. Pumped storage was traditionally used where excess low-cost electricity was available during low-usage periods. The economic logic was that cheap excess power justified the cost of recapturing a portion of the excess for later use. Read article

Ontario’s power policies an example of what not to do

20130707-102307-gGwyn Morgan,  The Globe and Mail

The political firestorm raging in Ontario about the cost of cancelling two natural-gas-fired power plants reminds me of a conversation I had with then-premier Dalton McGuinty in 2005. At the time, I was head of Encana Corp. and we were co-chairing a Public Policy Forum event. As we chatted privately before the dinner, he said: “As a gas producer, you must be happy we’re going to close our coal-fired power plants.” I replied: “Well, it’s not a big deal in the context of our North American gas markets, but you’d better make sure those gas power plants are built before you shut the coal plants.”

Eight years later, Ontario power consumers are stuck paying $585-million for two gas-fired plants that were never built. That’s just the tip of the iceberg. Mr. McGuinty’s decision to shutter the coal-fired plants was followed in 2010 by his government’s Green Energy and Economy Act, aimed at replacing some of the coal-fired power with highly subsidized wind and solar energy while, supposedly, turning Ontario into the green power capital of North America. Read article

Wynne’s wind fiasco

1297438693754_ORIGINALWebsite explains the real story of electricity generation in Ontario
By Lorrie Goldstein, Toronto Sun
There’s a simple way to understand the real story of electricity generation in Ontario — as opposed to the bafflegab coming from Premier Kathleen Wynne and the Liberals.

Go to www.ieso.ca, the website of the Independent Electricity System Operator, and look at the graphs at the right hand side of the page marked “Energy Demand” and, below that, “Generation By Fuel Type.” From that, you’ll learn three things Wynne and Co. are loathe to tell you about electricity generation in Ontario.

1. Nuclear power is the backbone of our system and will be for generations to come.
2. Contrary to their claims, the Liberals aren’t replacing coal power with wind, but with natural gas.
3. Wind power, despite its massive cost and the fury it has ignited in rural Ontario because of the dictatorial way the Liberals imposed it, actually supplies an inconsequential amount of electricity. (Solar is even smaller.)  Read article

Fedeli on Gas Plant Scandal

Nipissing MPP and PC Energy Critic Vic Fedeli outlines the shocking revelations about the Liberal gas plant scandal made at the Justice Committee earlier today in a sit down with CP24’s Stephen LeDrew.

Gas plant cancellations cost $585 million: Ontario Power Authority

moneydowntoiletToronto Sun
TORONTO – Ontarians will pay at least $585 million to not build gas plants in Oakville and Mississauga. Premier Kathleen Wynne wouldn’t apologize for the debacle Tuesday, but said she is frustrated with the process that led to the siting of the plants in unwelcoming communities. “I regret the situation and I have said that I take responsibility to make sure this never happens again,” Wynne said during an appearance before the Ontario Standing Committee on Justice Policy.

The premier said she was unaware of the cost when her government cancelled the Oakville plant in 2010 and the Mississauga plant in 2011, and instead depended on the Ontario Power Authority (OPA) to later provide the numbers. Colin Andersen, CEO of the Ontario Power Authority (OPA) which negotiated the settlements with the two private gas plant owners, told the committee the price for relocating the Oakville plant will be $310 million, not the $40 million often repeated by Ontario Liberals. Read article

Liberal Gas Plants growing out of control…

MacKay Editorial CartoonsGraeme MacKay

Green Energy Act: Ontario government still sees no evil

"Gee, we've never had any complaints before" - Wind Industry RepsRoss R. McKitrick and Kenneth P. Green, Toronto Sun
Earlier this month the Fraser Institute published a report sharply critical of one of the flagship policies of the Ontario government, the Green Energy Act (GEA). We found the Act is costing Ontario over $5 billion annually but yields negligible environmental benefits, and that equivalent or greater benefits could have been achieved using conventional pollution control measures at less than one-tenth the cost.

We also found that, due in large part to the GEA, Ontario is going from having some of the cheapest electricity in North America to having some of the most expensive. This will increase industry operating costs and cut the rate of return to investment in mining and manufacturing by between 13 and 30%, further weakening key economic sectors and threatening long term job losses. And we pointed out that the choice to pursue wind power under the GEA was a particularly bad idea, as wind power generation is almost perfectly out of phase with energy consumption in Ontario, resulting in the dumping of surplus wind energy into the U.S. market at a loss of some $200 million annually.

Shortly after its release our report was cited during a debate in the Ontario legislature on the GEA. Ontario Energy Minister Bob Chiarelli dismissed it out of hand, saying: “The Fraser Institute report recommends that we go back to coal. They claim that coal is clean, and they’re recommending we go back to coal.” That was the justification for shutting his eyes to the disaster that GEA policy has created. Read article

Wind turbines operate under great turbulence, with consequences for grid stability

windturbulencePhys.org
While previous research has shown that wind turbulence causes the power output of wind turbines to be intermittent, a new study has found that wind turbulence may have an even greater impact on power output than previously thought. The researchers modeled the conversion of wind speed to power output using data from a rural wind farm. The results showed that the intermittent properties of wind persist on the scale of an entire wind farm, and that wind turbines do not only transfer wind intermittency to the grid, but also increase it. The findings highlight the importance of fully understanding the physics of wind turbulence in order to ensure future grid stability. Read article

Cancelled Mississauga power plant cost $275 million: Ontario auditor general

Dalton GasRob Ferguson and John Spears. Toronto Star
Ontarians are paying twice for a single power plant, Auditor General Jim McCarter says in a scathing report that found it cost $275 million to scrap a generating station in Mississauga and move it to Sarnia. That’s $85 million, or 45 per cent, more than the $190 million former premier Dalton McGuinty claimed, prompting opposition parties to charge the government “lied” and providing fresh ammunition for a potential spring election.

The plant across from Sherway Gardens was well under construction and scrapped less than two weeks before the provincial vote of Oct. 6, 2011, a move Premier Kathleen Wynne admits was “politically motivated” to save Liberal seats. McCarter said compensating the plant’s builder for that decision cost taxpayers “a lot.” New Democrats and Progressive Conservatives quickly piled on.

“Families are stuck with the bills,” NDP Leader Andrea Horwath told reporters as the audit noted $190 million will come from taxpayers, with the other $85 million will come from electricity rates. Despite accusing the Liberals of “lying about this from day one,” Horwath said she’ll work with the government on a spring budget as early as next week on her demands for lower auto insurance rates and closing corporate tax loopholes. Read article