Wind turbine foes to get support at hearing

Dr. Nina Pierpont

by Charlie Fidleman, Montreal Gazette

For New York pediatrician and wind noise expert Nina Pierpont, wind farms blow nothing but an ill-wind.

Pierpont, who coined the term “Wind Turbine Syndrome,” says she’s not against windmills and renewable energy.

But Pierpont’s research of families living near wind turbines shows debilitating health effects – effects that start when the turbines are turned on and then disappear once families have moved away. Continue reading

Wind Turbine Syndrome

Author:  Pierpont, Nina

Wind turbines majestically threshing the wind — what marvels of human engineering! To stand beneath one is breathtaking. To live near one can be hell on earth. So I have been told by countless people who suddenly find themselves grievously ill from the subtle yet devastating infrasonic jackhammer generated by these “clean, green, renewable energy” giants. Continue reading

Letter from Nina Pierpont to Mike Crawley, International Power Canada Inc.

M. Crawley, International Power Canada, Inc.

Mike Crawley, President
International Power Canada Inc.
105 Commerce Valley Drive West, Suite 410
Markham, Ontario L3T 7W3 Canada

May 7,2010

Dear Mr. Crawley,

I am writing on behalf of XX, Harrow, Ontario. Mrs. X informs me that her home has nine (9) 1.65 MW V2 Vestas wind turbines within 2 km of her home. Three of these are within 1 km. Indeed, all 24 turbines (for this project) are within 5 km. Continue reading

Are wind farms a health risk?

Credit: By Jessica B. Mulholland | March 2010 | Governing.com

A study of families living near wind farms found nature’s energy might not be so healthy.

Wind energy is blowing hot right now. Nationwide, wind farms are bringing in renewable energy and jobs, such as in Montana, as detailed in “Propelling Growth.” Overall, wind turbines in the United States generated 52 billion kilowatt hours in 2008, which is enough to serve 4.6 million households, according to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). And demand is growing: The number of wind turbines in the U.S. nearly doubled between 2006 and 2008, according to the DOE. Continue reading

Wind Turbine Syndrome: Excerpts from the Executive Summary

Author:  Pierpont, Nina

The core of the book is a scientific report presenting original, primary research on symptomatic people living near large industrial wind turbines (1.5-3 MW) erected since 2004. The findings:

1) Wind turbines cause Wind Turbine Syndrome. We know this because people have symptoms when they are close to turbines and the symptoms go away when they are away from turbines. The study families themselves figured out that they had to move away from turbines to be rid of their symptoms, and nine out of ten have moved. Some sold and some abandoned their homes.

2) The symptoms are sleep disturbance and deprivation, headache, tinnitus (ringing in ears), ear pressure, dizziness, vertigo (spinning dizziness), nausea, visual blurring, tachycardia (fast heart rate), irritability, problems with concentration and memory, and panic episodes associated with sensations of movement or quivering inside the body that arise while awake or asleep. Continue reading

Executive Summary: Wind Turbine Syndrome

Download pdf here

Another huge thank you is in order to Dr. Nina Pierpont and Calvin Luther Martin  for donating  a large shipment of  books to Ontario.   These will be distributed to medical professionals throughout Ontario.  

Wind Turbine Syndrome: A Report on a Natural Experiment
Nina Pierpont, MD, PhD
Executive Summary 12/20/2009

The core of the book is a scientific report presenting original, primary research on symptomatic people living near large industrial wind turbines (1.5-3 MW) erected since 2004.

These are the findings:

  1. Wind turbines cause Wind Turbine Syndrome. We know this because people have symptoms when they are close to turbines and the symptoms go away when they are away from turbines. The study families themselves figured out that they had to move away from turbines to be rid of their symptoms, and nine out of ten have moved. Some sold and some abandoned their homes. 
  2. People do not abandon their homes out of “annoyance.” Reported symptoms, such as sleep deprivation, dizziness, and nausea, cannot be dismissed as “annoyances.” Continue reading