Anti-wind groups watching transmission line battle

wind transmission linesby Heather Wright, Sarnia This Week
Middlesex Lambton Wind Action is closely watching talks between Middlesex County and NextEra Energy. NextEra has several wind projects in Middlesex and Lambton County. It’s planning to build transmission lines to carry the energy created by the turbines in southern Ontario and it wants to build them on municipal and county right of ways.

NextEra recently went to Middlesex County Council to talk about the plan. Draft documents from the Jericho project, with 92 turbines in Lambton Shores and Warwick, show the transmission lines would also stretch into Lambton County. Lambton County Councilors recently gave county staff authority to negotiate with wind energy companies about access to county right of ways.

Esther Wrightman of Middlesex Lambton Wind Action says NextEra wants to build a separate line of polls to carry the energy being produced because Hydro One would not allow NextEra’s lines on their poles. In some areas, that could mean Hydro One poles on one side of the road and NextEra’s on the other.

“A good portion of our county roads will have poles on each side of the road,” she says. “You just double the chance of hitting a pole (in an accident) by putting poles on the other side of the road, too.” Middlesex County engineers have asked NextEra to come back to the county with plans from an engineer. Wrightman is pleased, saying the transmission lines will have a devastating effect on the landscape of rural Ontario.

“They will be running by people’s homes, near schools; it is very invasive, it is going to drastically change the community.” She’s also concerned about the infrastructure left behind “white elephants with transmission lines running down your road” she calls them, should the energy companies pull the turbines out of service. Read article

Election results show urban-rural divide

by Andre Den Tandt, Owen Sound Sun Times
Now that the provincial election is behind us, the results offer some startling insights into the political landscape, both locally and provincially.  At first glance, the overall results may seem inconclusive, with the Liberal Party just one seat short of a majority. But look again and the results are nothing short of stunning: The Liberals were shut out in every single rural riding, every single one. Just as obviously, the Progressive Conservative party was shut out in all the major cities, as they were four years ago. That’s an urban-vs-rural divide such as has never been seen in Ontario, and it’s very bad news: large-city majorities can run roughshod over rural people and their interests without suffering any serious political consequences. Continue reading