PEC Naturalists’ court date set for final appeal to prevent turbines

Ostrander-PointCountylive.ca
The Prince Edward County Field Naturalists will be back in court in December in a final appeal to prevent Gilead Power and the Ministry of Environment from putting wind turbines on important natural habitat at Ostrander Point. The appeal of a Divisional Court Decision is to be heard Dec. 8-9 at Osgoode Hall in Toronto.

PECFN started opposing this plan when it was first announced in 2007,” notes Cheryl Anderson, of the PECFN. “The opposition is based on a strong belief that the South Shore of Prince Edward County is the wrong place for wind turbines.  The area is important to migrating birds, bats and butterflies, it contains Areas of Natural and Scientific Interest, provincially significant wetlands, globally imperilled Alvar habitat and is the home and breeding ground of several avian, reptilian and amphibian species at risk. ”

In spring 2013, PECFN participated in an Environmental Review Tribunal appealing the government’s decision to allow Gilead’s development.  The ERT panellists agreed that the development should not proceed.  The Government and Gilead appealed that decision to the Divisional Court of Ontario. Read article

53 thoughts on “PEC Naturalists’ court date set for final appeal to prevent turbines

  1. Alvar, Google, What is an Alvar or Michigan Natural Features Inventory

    Michigan State University Extension

    Links don’t work to the Michigan Natural Features Inventory. Select Data Resources > Alvar

    Has lists of rare plant and animal species of Michigan Alvars.

    Major threats are related to road construction, quarry development, etc.
    Quarry is a hole in the ground just like IWT pads are holes in the ground.

    Road construction and associated maintenance facilitate the rapid introduction and expansion of invasive plants.

    Ontario Ministry employees who don’t know about Alvars or are being over-ruled?

  2. Every person opposed to wind turbines should definitely attend this court date at Osgoode Hall in Toronto. I would hope that at least 1000 people attend this to ensure that our voice matters. December 8th-9th is on my calendar. Is it on yours? Keep up the fight.

    • Yes, you are absolutely right. Dec. 8,9; mark it on your calendar. No excuses, Christmas parties, whatever. YOU must fight your fight. Conplacentcy is exactly what the government and big wind expects and wants.

  3. Nearby high school science classes have a rare ecosystem that would provide many science projects for them but they need an invitation to participate in OP activities.

    • Then there are the Lake Erie Islands alvars in Ontario and Ohio in the western end of Lake Erie.

      • IMO, under the circumstances the OP situation should be looked at by the OPP?

      • OP is Crown land and NOT private property. So OPP has jurisdiction which it does not have on private property involving private contracts.

  4. Seems that people don’t understand what an alvar is?

    They are rare ecosystems with not many around the world. Given the information and evidence of what is known about alvars this OP permit never should have been granted.

    IMO, how could this have happened? Incompetence or over-rulings by decision makers?

  5. What kind of racket has the Ontario government become?

    In case you were wondering:

    ‘[excerpt] The Office of the Integrity Commissioner has investigative powers only under the Members’ Integrity Act, 1994, where one MPP files a complaint about the actions of another MPP. As such, an investigation into a matter such as industrial wind turbines would not fall within our mandate.

    Best regards,’

    What BIAS!

  6. Rural Ontarians can search for and present plenty of information to the public about alvars.

    No point in QP trying to dodge the issues at OP.

  7. U.S. EPA

    Great Lakes Ecosystems: Introduction

    “The lakes, and the basin they drain, have played a major role in the history and development of the United States and Canada. The basin supports more than one-tenth of the U.S. population and more than one-fourth of the population of Canada. Nearly 25% of the total Canadian agricultural production and 7% of the U.S. agricultural production occurs in the basin.”

    http://www.epa.gov/ecopage/glbd/issues/intro.html

    Every acre of farm land that IWTs and solar parks occupy is important.

  8. McMaster University

    Canada average growing season map:
    Orange area, 152-193 days
    Yellow area, 125-151 days

    The largest & longest growing season area in Canada is in the Great Lakes basin area.

    https://library.mcmaster.ca/maps/ac_grow.htm

    —————————————————————————————–

    The Old Farmer’s Almanac

    Chart of average frost free days by city
    Scroll down to Ontario:
    Low, Kapukasing 87 days
    Toronto, 149 days
    High, Windsor, 179 days

    http://www.almanac.com/content/frost-chart-canada

    • Natural Resources Canada

      Canada’s Plant Hardiness site:
      http://www.planthardiness.gc.ca/?m=1

      Map of Canada’s plant hardiness zones provides insight about what can be grown and where.
      Again, the Great Lakes Basin and southern Ontario are shown as plant hardy areas

      People are being led to believe that using agricultural land for renewables won’t make any difference. Enough frost free days are needed to produce food crops. Not that many areas in Canada meet the needs for frost free growing areas.

  9. On the topic of NEGLIGENT MISREPRESENTATIONS:

    ‘[excerpt] We hear from folks on the ground that, once projects start running, many neighbours have privately expressed pleasant surprise that the turbines cause them no difficulty and are easy to get used to. Nocebo effects only happen if people believe in them.

    By Jennifer Kalnins Temple and Dianne Saxe’

    Municipal Anti-Wind By-Laws Inoperative
    by Jennifer Kalnins Temple on September 3, 2014
    http://envirolaw.com/anti-wind-bylaws/

    • And the economic effects of IWTs are still there anyway even if they don’t affect some people’s health.

      Plenty of Ontarians are willing to buy the rope to hang themselves by continuing to do business with those who are supporting this.

      Just a bit on the food production issue. Canada ,due to its climate, does not have a whole of land/space to produce food. And with a small population is able to get by this problem.

      U.S. has plenty of land to grow food on as it is farther south.

    • Dianne Saxe = Morton Shulman = NDP

      Was about to purchase a book on Algonquin Park. While thumbing through the pages, noticed that Dianne Saxe was a “contributor”. Further perusal revealed hidden agendas in the text. Didn’t buy the book ’cause all this negative reading was rendering me a victim of the Nocebo effect. That nasty affliction knows no bounds.

      • The Green Energy Act itself has never been court tested to determine if all of its provisions are legal. So which parts are and which parts aren’t?

        Is this a court decision that removing the rights of the people is ok?

  10. Ostrander Point Wind Energy LP
    Gilead Power & OPTrust project.

    OPTrust is the fund manager and administrator of OPSEU Pension Plan, Toronto, jointly sponsored by the Government of Ontario and Ontario Public service Employees Union/OPSEU.

    William H. Hatanaka, Pres.
    http://investing.businessweek.com/research/stocks/private/board.asp?privcapId=27527090

    ———————————————————————————————
    TD Canada Trust-TD Resource

    William H. Hatanaka, Officer & Director. Also Executive Officer of TD Trust Asset Management Inc.

    http://investing.businessweek.com/research/stocks/private/board.asp?privcapId=28112664

  11. Another issue is how did this company get a crown land use permit for a rare alvar to begin with?

    If migratory birds have to change their flight paths and resting places to avoid OP then the ecology of this alvar will change,

    Example of this is that spring and fall these birds add additional fertilizer to this alvar. Not having this additional fertilizer can change the whole ecology of this alvar.

  12. Orillia Packet, April, 18, 2009

    “New guide book helps you discover what you can find in plain sight”

    “Alvar Specialty Plants of Central Ontario”

    This 67 page guide book describes 53 species commonly found on Ontario’s alvars.

    This guide book was prepared with funding from:

    Waterway Wildlife Program of the Trent-Severn Waterway (Parks Canada)
    Ontario Species At Risk Stewardship Fund
    Environment Canada’s Habitat Stewardship Program for Species at Risk

    http://www.orilliapacket.com/2009/04/18/new-guide-helps-you-discover-what-you-can-find-in-plain-sight

    Maybe all these postings will help to put the OP issues into better perspective for the public.
    The above information goes back to 2009.

  13. Almost any exhibition of complete self-sufficiency draws a stunned tribute from me..

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