Failed rink wind turbine investments to be returned

PEICBC News
The four P.E.I. communities that put wind turbines up at their rinks have been given their initial investment back by the province. The province will also cover the cost of taking down the turbines in Alberton, Kensington, Crapaud and Murray River.

Kensington CAO Geoff Baker told CBC News the town is happy it’s getting its $70,000 investment back and that the turbine is coming down. “We’re disappointed that the project didn’t work, really from the very beginning,” said Baker. “I would say we’re very pleased that the Wind Energy Institute and the provincial government came through and really looked after us as far as the investment we made into the project.”

Kensington’s rink was one of four that hoped to reduce electricity bills through wind energy, a project that received joint funding of almost $1.3 million from the communities, and provincial and federal governments. The Wind Energy Institute of Canada was the project manager. It chose a turbine made by Seaforth and decided which P.E.I. rinks were the best sites.

But Kensington’s turbine only produced a third of the power the wind institute projected. Read article

7 thoughts on “Failed rink wind turbine investments to be returned

  1. The Windes’ Lie didn’t you know that? The projected energy does not come from wind…it comes from subsidises! Glad to hear that the turbine will come down. (1)? so far? Wish it was that easy here in Ontario, the province that is looking like the Pin Cushing Wind Capitol in Canada!

  2. The Wind Energy Institute Of Canada

    Board includes:
    Yves Gagnon
    Tom Levy, CanWEA

    http://www.weican.ca/about/people.php

    ————————————————————————

    Science Advice, Wind Turbine Noise Expert Panel included:

    Yves Gagnon ,also associate editor of ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Journal of Solar Energy which also includes wind energy.

    http://www.scienceadvice.ca/assesments/completed/wind-turbine-noise/expert-panel/gagnon.aspx

    Connections to events and people should be noted.

  3. Small scale compared to what We see everyday. The economics make no sense big or small. At least some people know where to draw the line.

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